How does the skin function?

The skin is made up of several layers placed one on top of the other: The epidermis: the outermost layer of the skin, the epidermis is covered by the stratum corneum, similar to a pile of flat, resistant cells. It serves as a protective envelope, sheltering the body from microbes. It is studded with pores …

Epidermolysis bullosa

What is epidermolysis bullosa? In patients with epidermolysis bullosa, more or less large blisters containing a clear, transparent fluid appear on the skin. They can mainly be found on the feet, hands, and sometimes on the mucous membranes (mouth, genital areas). When they burst, the blisters leave the skin raw, which is then difficult to …

Pressure ulcers

What is a pressure ulcer? A pressure ulcer is a chronic wound which appears when sitting or lying for a prolonged period which creates pressure in the weight-bearing areas. This pressure compresses the tissue between two hard surfaces prevents the blood from flowing normally leading to reduced oxygen supply, which causes damage to the tissue …

Burns

This type of accident is most often domestic, occurring in the kitchen or in the garden especially. In almost half of cases, burns are caused by contact with a hot liquid, fire or hot object. However, explosions, chemical burns and exposure to light or radiation are a lot less common. The arm is the part of …

Leg ulcers

What is a leg ulcer ? Located on the lower third of the leg (under the knee), leg ulcers are chronic wounds that have not healed after 6 weeks. The wounds may be caused by a knock, by scratching, or even appear on their own. Leg ulcers take different forms. Venous leg ulcers (70% of …

Diabetic foot ulcers

What causes diabetic foot ulcers? Diabetes does not only cause blood sugar imbalance. It also causes two phenomena which increase the risk of occurrence of a diabetic foot ulcer: Involvement of the distal nerves of the legs, especially with loss of sensitivity. As a result, the patients only rarely feel they have an ulcer (neuropathic …

Healing, the main principles

Acute wounds and chronic wounds have different healing times. Acute wounds (burns, cuts, scratches etc.) heal faster (in around 2 to 4 weeks) than chronic wounds, which take an average healing of 210 days1, i.e. almost 7 months. However, chronic wounds are often related to an underlying disease such as diabetes, or venous or arterial …